Day 2: Let Go of Bad Habits 

You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step. 
-Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We all have things we would like to improve or even let go of altogether. Change can form some level of fear inside of us because of uncertainty. Whatever that fear might be, it is possible to overcome. We have put together a system that helps make it less taxing, committing to making changes.

To transform our lives, we must first become aware of patterns that don’t bring us closer to our goals.


Step 1: Become conscious of your daily patterns.

Recognizing destructive behaviors can transform the quality of our lives. Paying more attention to our daily routine can help us figure out what is beneficial and what is a disservice to us.

Step 2: Write down three habits you would like to change.

For example, making a list to quit: smoking, drinking, eating junk food, unhealthy spending habits, etc., gets us much closer to achieving our goal. Seeing it on paper kickstarts our drive to get started. Remember: be specific about what you would like to improve.

Step 3: Keep track of your progress

Of course, checking off an achievement will give you a boost to tackle the next on the list. Nevertheless, If you feel the task is too much for you to do on your own, and need help overcoming a personal obstacle, try seeking help from an outside source such as counseling or a loved one.

Step 4: Follow through

Let’s set ourselves up for success! Making the things you’ve written down on your list a priority is imperative to attain success. If your goal seems unreachable, instead of procrastinating, take “baby steps,” such as portion control instead of going “cold turkey.”

4 steps to help with letting go of bad habits and replacing them with good ones

To transform our lives, we must first become aware of patterns that don’t bring us closer to our goals. We all have things we would like to improve or even let go of altogether. Change can form some level of fear inside of us because of uncertainty. Whatever that fear might be, it is possible to overcome. A series of four steps have been put together for you to make it less taxing committing to changes.  

Step1: Become conscious of your daily patterns to make necessary changes

To address any issue, you must first recognize and acknowledge something has gone awry. While this is easier said than done, this is part of the process can not be skipped.

Recognizing destructive behaviors can transform the quality of our lives. To do so, you must first figure out where these habits stem from; is there something specific that provokes the pattern? 

Paying more attention to our daily routine can help us figure out what is beneficial and what is a disservice to us. Try spending some time tracking where these habits come from and whether they follow any specific pattern, like a time of day, at a particular place or if it happens when you are with a particular crowd. 

Now that you have become conscious and have more than a theory of where these bad habits were birthed, the next step is   know why you want to break the habit. 

So, why do you want to change? Will the change be rewarding to you and others around you? And most importantly, are you willing to put in the effort to evolve?

Step2: Write down the top three bad habits you would like to change.

So you are now conscious about the habits you would like to do away with for good. You also have decided you are willing to put the work in to change the outcome of your bad habits. Now what? Well, you’ve got to take it a step further. Start by making a list of the top three bad habits you would like to change and replace them with healthier ones.

Seeing all the things you’d like to adjust on paper kickstarts your drive to get started. Remember: be specific about what you would like to improve. For example, making a list to quit: smoking, drinking, eating junk food, unhealthy spending habits, etc., will get you much closer to achieving your goal, and adding in ideas of healthier alternatives is even better!

Of course, you can’t eliminate a bad habit; you must replace it with something else that provides similar if not more significant benefits. For instance, if you are a person who tends to overindulge in sweets in time when feeling stressed, it’s probably not a great idea to stop. Instead, try listing out ways to deal with the stresses in your life. 

An example of this could be: breathing exercises, meditating or, healthier food choices that are just as satisfying as the not-so-healthy choices you’ve been choosing so far. Implement the new behavior instead of reaching for unhealthy sweets.

Bad habit helps you fill a void. And for that logic, it would be better to choose a healthier action to replace the bad habit that provides that same need.

Step3: Keep track of your progress and stumbles

So you have become conscious of the bad habits that no longer serve you (check), made a list of said habits (double-check)…by all means, keep track of your progress. At this point, you might be feeling unstoppable. Checking off achievements will give you that boost to tackle the next one on the list.

Keep in mind, the way you choose to keep track of your progress is entirely up to you. Whether it’s little notes you write to yourself, using a chart, or keeping a journal, be sure to track the good and not-so-good progress…Yeah, there will be stumbles along the way; no one is perfect. The real test will be how you handle those setbacks. Will you dust yourself off and keep moving forward in your progress?

 Nevertheless, If you feel the task is too much for you to do on your own, and need help overcoming a personal obstacle, try seeking help from an outside source such as a counselor or a loved one. Someone who might have similar habits they would like to replace with better ones as well or someone who can offer support and sound advice. So keep tracking on…

Step4: Follow through to achieve success

Now let’s set you up for success! Making what you’ve written down on your list of bad habits you would like to replace a priority is imperative to attain the success you are looking to acquire. Writing a plan, and following through, though, are in two different ballparks. It would help if you remained steadfast about your goals. Keep yourself accountable and follow through.

Do not rely on willpower alone. If your goal to break that bad habit seems unreachable, instead of procrastinating, consider taking “baby steps.” For example: if you are watching what you eat more closely nowadays, try portion control instead of going “cold turkey.” Please don’t dismiss your “baby steps.”

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” -Lao Tzu

Any progress is, in fact, progress! It might not be what you were hoping for, but you are one step closer to what to you set out to accomplish, so pat yourself on the back;)…and…By all means, try incentivizing yourself to reach the different milestones you’ve outlined. Sometimes you need other triggers of motivation to get to the next phase of your goal.

If you still need more to keep you on track, raise the stakes, find someone who will keep you accountable with the pledge you have made to yourself.

So go ahead, stay conscious, make your list, keep track of your progress and follow through!  

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